chocolate peanut butter treats

Chocolate Peanut Butter Ritz Treats

I look forward to the Thanksgiving/Christmas holiday season. This is the season of family get togethers, good food, laughing till it hurts, cousins sitting around the living room remember when we were kids while watching our kids play together, and eating desserts that typically only come out at this time of year.

One dessert I pass everything else up for is a three ingredient treasure- chocolate, peanut butter, and Ritz crackers.

That’s it.

chocolate peanut butter ritz treats

We just call them Chocolate Peanut Butter Ritz Treats, but they should have a better name considering how delicious they are. And don’t expect them to fall under any of the “healthy” categories of food these days…

…we’ll just pretend they are calorie free!

You can definitely involve your children in making these treats. One can spread the peanut butter…

…one can sandwich the crackers…

…and Mom can dip them in the melted chocolate.

How easy was that!

chocolate peanut butter ritz treats

At this time of year, you can often find the ingredients on sale. Does it get any better than that?

These treats are so easy to make and are so loved, my sister requested my aunt (maker of this treat) to make them with white chocolate instead of milk chocolate as favors at her wedding. She had them boxed in little white boxes with ribbon to match her wedding colors and placed at each table setting. Simply beautiful.

chocolate peanut butter ritz treats

Ingredients:

Ritz crackers
Peanut butter
Melted dipping chocolate (packaged as almond bars)

Directions:

  1. Using peanut butter and Ritz crackers, make little sandwiches.
  2. Dip Ritz peanut butter sandwiches in melted chocolate.
  3. Set on a wax paper lined cookie sheet and put in the refrigerator for 10 minutes.
  4. Sit back and enjoy.

I would love to hear of any quick or simple recipes you enjoy around the holidays. Feel free to share with us your recipe or the link to one on your own blog in the comments.

The original post can be found here.

chocolate peanut butter ritz treats

mom's delicious chicken soup

Mom’s Delicious Chicken Soup

October. The time of year when nothing beats a warm bowl of soup in the evening. Here in Florida, the cool mornings and evenings give us the brief feel of fall the rest of the states take for granted.

It is usually during this time that I pull out my favorite soup recipe. It keeps me warm in my body and heart because this is my mother’s recipe.

Mom made this soup for us regularly, but because she usually used what she had on hand, we were never guaranteed to have the same version of her soup twice. But regardless, it was always delicious.

During my pregnancy of Addie, I caught whatever bug was passing through my classroom, so Mom came over and made me a pot of her chicken soup. I don’t know why, but I asked her for the recipe, “Just so I have it…” Boy, am I glad I asked, because Mom passed away shortly after.

moms-chicken-soup

I love having simple recipes on hand that I can pull out when my schedule has thrown a curve ball at me, but still allow me to serve a hearty, healthful meal for my family.

This is one of those recipes.

What I love the most about this recipe is that it lends itself to customization and tweaks very easily. If you make your own chicken broth or stock, use that as the base for your soup instead of water. I love throwing carrots, celery, and corn in my soup to make it “stretch farther” as my mom would have said (there was a Spanish phrase she used that I can hear in my head, but I cannot for the life of me spell out!).

Do you have a soup that you love to make in the fall? Feel free to share your recipe in the comments.

chicken soup

Mom’s Chicken Soup

Ingredients:
  • Stock pot 1/2 filled with water
  • 1 packet Badia Sazon Tropical (found in the Hispanic section of your grocery store)
  • 2 packets Sazon with Achote (there are a variety of Sazon products- also found in the Hispanic section)
  • Adoboe (also in the Hispanic section- a salty flavoring. Season to taste)
  • 2 tbsp Sofrito (also in the Hispanic section)
  • 6 olives
  • 6 skinless chicken drumsticks (you can use any type of chicken/turkey you prefer or have on hand)
  • 1 cup uncooked rice, lentels, or beans
Directions:
  1. Combine the first 6 ingredients in the stock pot with water, and bring them to a boil.
  2. Reduce the heat to a simmer setting and cover.
  3. After 45 min., add the final ingredient (rice, lentels, or beans) and cook until softened.

This recipe will make quite a bit worth freezing for a later date. After storing, the soup will thicken. Add a cup of water when reheating.

chicken soup

Celebrate the Ordinary Days

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Making ordinary days special for my family has always been a goal for me.  In fact, one of my goals when I first became a mom was to make life wonderful for my family. Not just the big days, but more importantly, the little days- the days that no one else but us would see and know about.

Then I began noticing that there were “special” days everywhere. National Popcorn Day. National Donut Day. National Hot Dog Day. And my personal favorite, National Coffee Day!

special-days

I like that  there are special days because it makes ordinary days just a bit more special. I am the mom who makes the popcorn, gets the free donuts (with the purchase of a beverage…. and then my donut is not so free anymore), makes hot dogs on that particular night, and takes her kids out in the pouring rain to get the coffee (because coffee makes my world go around).

Yet, those were not the only special days that I wanted to create for my family.

I wanted to make the ordinary days special- the special days that do not show up on the calendar.

I wanted to purposefully plan to make a regular Tuesday special by planning ahead a simple but memorable activity for my kids to look back on.

I wanted to plan ahead for a special time for my husband and I to enjoy after the kids had gone to bed.

So I did.

I began thinking about ways to make some of our ordinary days special. These are just a few ideas to get you started on making ordinary days special for your family.

  • Donut Day- Get your donut and then read your littles the book If You Give a Dog a Donut while you eat your donuts.
  • Chick-Fil-A Cow Appreciation Day- It is so much fun to dress up for your lunch or dinner! Pull out the paint, the old t-shirts, and some construction paper and make an event of going to your local Chick-Fil-A. special-days
  • American Girl Girl of the Year movie premier- If your little girl is a fan of AG like mine is, the date of the movie premier can turn an ordinary day into something special. We tend to make a girly afternoon of it. I pull out my nail polishes, curlers, hair straightener, curling iron, and then I paint my daughter’s nails and do her hair. She picks out a cute outfit complete with as many accessories as she wants, and we watch the movie together.
  • Beach Day- One benefit of living in Florida is the nearness and accessibility to beaches. The surf and sand have a way of making any ordinary day special. Pack a light lunch such as fruits, cheese sticks, pretzels, trail mix, plenty of water, and sunscreen and let them play. Sometimes we bring beach toys, sometimes we don’t.  ordinary-days
  • National Puppy Day- Do you have a dog? We don’t. But we can still celebrate National Puppy Day by going to a pet store and playing with the puppies.
  • Ring in the Olympics- There are so many ways to make the Olympics a special time for our families. We make our own torch, and, during the opening ceremonies, we have our very own torch relay. This time around, we have also chosen a particular sport to follow (gymnastics) and particular athlete to root for (Gabby Douglas). special-days
  • Cookie Day- As a little girl, every year, our mom would take one day around Christmas to do nothing but bake cookies. One year, we baked 500 cookies. Then we gave those cookies to others in our church as gifts.
  • First Day of Each Season- It doesn’t have to be anything special, but commemorating the first day of each season can make that day special. For the first day of spring, we love going to Rita’s for a free ice. On the first day of fall, we decorate our home for fall- adding autumn colored leaves to our arrangements and decorative greenery, pulling out our previously made fall crafts, and even some of our Thanksgiving items. For the first day of summer we enjoy going to the beach, and on the first day of winter, we typically celebrate Snowman Day (mentioned below).
  • Snowman Day- Here in Florida, my kids can only dream of snow, so snowmen are an impossibility for us…. or are they? We made an entire day based on snowmen, complete with homemade snowman shirts, snowman shaped pizza, have a “snowball fight” made of crumpled paper towels, and then collecting all of our paper owls on white garbage bags to build a snowman. You can see more of our first Snowman Day in this Smilebox slideshow.

It doesn’t take a lot of effort to make an ordinary day more than just a day.

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purposeful-moms

Learning to Enjoy Things without Owning Them

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I want my children to have access to as many things as possible that will teach them and help them reach their highest potential. However…..

I do not want to own all of those things.

So how is it possible to give my children the resources they need without feeling the need to purchase it all?

One thing that I remember our mother doing with us as girls was taking a weekly trip to the library. We would walk there (it was a five minute walk from our house) and spend a couple of hours doing school work (we were homeschooled) and looking through the books. We became friends with the librarians and looked forward to our time spent there.

Fast forward twenty-something years, and I am now the mother taking her children to the library.

 

purposeful-moms

The library has changed a lot since I was a kid- there are now computers, games, puzzles, and cool bean bag chairs for making yourself comfortable  with a good book. There is now story time for children under the school age during the school year and learning class time for all ages during the summer.

The library has thousands of books, that are available to enjoy. Toddlers, children and adults alike can enjoy all of the books free of charge (unless one is late returning these books, then there is a late fee…. speaking of…..).

One of the steps to simplicity found in Celebration of Discipline by Richard J. Foster is learn to enjoy things without owning them.

There are so many books I want my children to enjoy, but it would be impossible for us to buy them all. A library offers access to a plethora of materials for education and entertainment.

Learning to enjoy things without owning them can reach far beyond books. There are parks, beaches, festivals, and other things that can be enjoyed for free or for a nominal price without having to own anything.

library3

The beauty of learning to find ways of enjoying things without owning them is two-fold. In some cases it teaches patience in waiting your turn before you can enjoy something. It also reduces the amount of stuff brought into your living space which keeps clutter at bay. Clutter is an enemy of simplicity.

I want my children to grow up understanding they do not need to own everything in order to enjoy it.

They do not need to have an extensive video library; they can borrow movies from the library or rent them for a $2.50 at a local kiosk or wait for them to arrive on Netflix. They do not need to download every song they like; they can enjoy Pandora or Spotify free of charge and enjoy their favorite songs and find others like it. They do not need to purchase every book they want to read; they can borrow it from the library.

library2

What important lessons will this teach them in the long run?

  • Not everything needs to be owned in order for them to enjoy it.
  • To save their money for things they really want or need.
  • To critically think about purchases they do make.
  • Less clutter equals less stress.

How will they learn this lesson?

It starts with me and the example I show them. Children will not learn this lesson on their own. They need to be shown that we can learn to find ways to enjoy things without owning them in order for them to learn how to do the same.

The library is a good place to start.

This post was originally posted here at The Joy of Homemaking.